All posts by MajorTim.space

MajorTim.space’s ‘Galactic Outreach Workshops’ with Girlguiding 12th Llandudno Brownies at their RSPB Conwy Wild Sleepout – 10th & 11th August 2019!

We had a fantastic time with Girlguiding 12th Llandudno Brownies at their RSPB Conwy Wild Sleepout, building boats & having a competition to test their stability – 10th & 11th August 2019.

Each boat had to hold a hard boiled egg and keep it dry!

They each got to test their boats once to make improvements before the competition.

Everyone enjoyed learning about the centre of mass, buoyancy, streamline boats and water resistance!

The mission on Saturday (10.08.2019) was to build and test their boats.

Sunday (11.08.2019) morning was competition time….

The winning boat (Brownie Speeds) was built by……..

Anya!

The boat (The Do Not Know Boat) that ‘sailed’ into 2nd place was built by…..

Izzy!

The boat that came 3rd was creatively built by…..

Emmie!

Photo below – Izzy and Emmie –

The winner and runner-ups pose for a photo after the competitive competition –

 

We took our MajorTim.space Galactic Photo Prop which was very popular with the visitors!
More photos of the Brownies with the photo accessory at the end of the article.

The boats in the final were subject to very adverse ‘weather conditions’ with powerful waves…..  here we find out who the winner is –

Fantastic and innovative boat designs by the Brownies, which were very impressive!
A great educational and fun time had by all!

Scroll down for photos and another video of the workshop…..

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MajorTim.space’s ‘Galactic Outreach Workshops’ at RSPB Conwy’s Big Wild Sleepout – 3rd & 4th August 2019!

We had a fantastic time running our Mars Mission egg drop workshop at RSPB Conwy’s Big Wild Sleepout – 3rd & 4th August 2019.

We challenged the families to design and make a protective lander for the equipment so that it lands safely on Mars.
They worked on the Saturday evening (3rd August 2019) to design and build Mars landers from a range of materials.

They had to minimize the force of the impact in order to give their eggs the best chance of survival!

They learnt about acceleration, velocity,  gravity and much more!

On the Sunday morning (4th August 2019) – we returned to the Camp at RSPB Conwy and held the competition to test which lander’s expensive technical equipment (a raw egg) would survive the long drop from the probe to the surface of Mars!

The winning lander (Blast off Hedgehog) was built by…..

Keagan, Kate and Rowen!

 

The lander (Falcon Lander) in second place was built by….

Nicholas!

 

The lander (Nature Express) in third position was built by…..

Gwen!

 

The winners and runner-ups pose for a group photo –

 

Plus, Sunday we were also running our drop-in ‘Minuscule Phenomenon!’ workshops – which includes the opportunity to find and see Tardigrades through microscopes, learn all the facts and meet Mossy, our large-scale 3d printed model of a Tardigrade to see what their fascinating features look like in more detail.

 

Congratulations to the winners and all of the participants.

All of the visitors had a STEMtastic time!

Scroll down for photos and videos……

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Dallas Campbell’s book delights young reader Dulcie

On the Apollo 50th Anniversary (20th July 2019) we were running drop-in workshops and a raffle at World Museum, Liverpool’s Footprints on the Moon event.

The lucky winner of our raffle was Dulcie Hutchinson age 6.
The prize – A signed copy of Ad Astra: An Illustrated Guide to Leaving the Planet – By Dallas Campbell and the chance to review it for the MajorTim.space blog.

We are absolutely thrilled to publish Dulcie’s fantastic review of the book –
HERE IT IS…….

Name: Dulcie May Hutchinson

Age: 6

Book:  Ad Astra: an illustrated Guide to leaving the planet by DALLAS CAMPBELL

This is a very interesting book.  It tells us all about things in space and how humans have learnt about them.  It also describes how we have explored space and what we could do in the future.

It is very exciting and filled with very exciting pictures and photographs.

One of my favourites is the picture of the Universe on page 15.  It is so amazing how many stars there are in the Universe.  I was very surprised when I saw how many satellites are in orbit around the Earth, I don’t know how a rocket would be able to get past them without crashing!

My Dad really likes the first part of the book where there is a lot of history about how humans first thought about the sky above them.  This shows that the book is good for people of all ages.

There are some funny stories and some weird ones used to explain things about space, I like the story about the moth who tries to fly to the stars all of his life.

I think that this book is amazing and very interesting.

Everybody would love it!

Dulcie Hutchinson

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MajorTim.space’s ‘Galactic Outreach Workshops’ at RSPB Conwy’s Big Wild Sleepout – 3rd & 4th August 2019!

We will be running our Mars Mission egg drop workshop at RSPB Conwy’s Big Wild Sleepout – 3rd & 4th August 2019.

We will challenge the participants to design and make a protective lander for the equipment (a raw egg) so that it lands safely on Mars.

On Saturday (03.08.2019) evening they will design and build a Mars lander from a range of materials.
The landers will then be put to the test in our competition to see which survive the impact to the surface of ‘Mars’ on Sunday (04.08.2019) morning.

Plus, Sunday we will also be running our drop-in ‘Minuscule Phenomenon!’ workshops – which includes the opportunity to find and see Tardigrades through microscopes, learn all the facts and meet Mossy, our large-scale 3d printed model of a Tardigrade to see what their fascinating features look like in more detail.

If you will be attending – come and find us to have a STEMtastic time!

Here is a video from when we last held our Mars Mission egg drop workshop at RSPB Conwy –

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MajorTim.space’s ‘Galactic Outreach Workshops’ at World Museum, Liverpool’s Footprints on the Moon event – Apollo 50th Anniversary – 20th July 2019!

We had a fantastic time running our drop-in ‘Minuscule Phenomenon!’ workshops, along with Thaumatropes and ‘Pioneer of STEM’ activity at World Museum, Liverpool’s Footprints on the Moon event – 20th July 2019!

The fantastic event was held on the Apollo 50th Anniversary so we celebrated by running our drop-in workshops.

Visitors enjoyed taking part in our drop-in ‘Minuscule Phenomenon!’ workshops, which includes the opportunity to find and see Tardigrades through microscopes, learn all the facts and meet Mossy, our large-scale 3d printed model of a Tardigrade to see what their fascinating features look like in more detail.

Every time we run our ‘Minuscule Phenomenon!’ workshops, we take as many photos as possible of the visitors with Mossy (the 3d printed Tardigrade).
Mossy was very popular!
More photos of visitors with Mossy at the end of the article.

In addition to the activities above – we were also running our popular Thaumatrope workshop – Apollo theme!

Plus, we had our new ‘Design your own Pioneer of STEM’ activity.

We took our MajorTim.space Galactic Photo Prop which was very popular with the visitors!
More photos of visitors with the photo accessory at the end of the article.

The lucky winner of our raffle was Dulcie Hutchinson(below)!
The prize – A signed copy of Ad Astra: An Illustrated Guide to Leaving the Planet – By Dallas Campbell and the chance to review it for the MajorTim.space blog.
Professor Andy Newsam from Liverpool John Moores University pulled out the winning ticket.
Dulcie’s book review coming soon – it’s going to be great.

 

All of the visitors to our stand had STEMtastic time celebrating Apollo 50th Anniversary with us!

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“The Eagle has landed” – Apollo 50th Anniversary

History was made 50 years ago today (20th July), when the first humans set foot on the Moon during Apollo 11.  Watched live on television by a worldwide audience, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin went where no one had gone before.

The historic Apollo lunar landing on July 20, 1969 paved the way for future space exploration and opened the door to boundless curiosity and discovery.  The 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission symbolizes how anything is possible.  We are all explorers who can do our part to expand knowledge and be a part of the NASA mission.

Mission Objective
The primary objective of Apollo 11 was to complete a national goal set by President John F. Kennedy on May 25, 1961: perform a crewed lunar landing and return to Earth.

Additional flight objectives included scientific exploration by the lunar module, or LM, crew; deployment of a television camera to transmit signals to Earth, deployment of a solar wind composition experiment, seismic experiment package and a Laser Ranging Retroreflector.  During the exploration, the two astronauts were to gather samples of lunar-surface materials for return to Earth.  They also were to extensively photograph the lunar terrain, the deployed scientific equipment, the LM spacecraft and each other, both with still and motion picture cameras.  This was to be the last Apollo mission to fly a “free-return” trajectory, which would enable a return to Earth with no engine firing, providing a ready abort of the mission at any time prior to lunar orbit insertion.

Mission Highlights

Apollo 11 launched from Cape Kennedy on July 16, 1969, carrying Commander Neil Armstrong, Command Module Pilot Michael Collins and Lunar Module Pilot Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin into an initial Earth-orbit of 114 by 116 miles.  An estimated 650 million people watched Armstrong’s televised image and heard his voice describe the event as he took “…one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind” on July 20, 1969.

After a landing that included dodging a lunar crater and boulder field just before touchdown, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin explored the area around their lunar landing site for more than two hours.  They collected soil and rock samples, set up experiments, planted an American flag and left behind medallions honouring the Apollo 1 crew and a plaque saying, “We came in peace for all mankind.”

Crew:  Neil Armstrong (commander), Edwin Eugene ‘Buzz’ Aldrin Jr (lunar module pilot), Michael Collins (command module pilot).

Launch:  July 16, 1969 – lunar landing: July 20 – splashdown: July 24.

Buzz Aldrin walks on the surface of the moon near the leg of the lunar module Eagle during the Apollo 11 mission.  Mission commander Neil Armstrong took this photograph with a 70mm lunar surface camera.

While astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin explored the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Michael Collins remained with the command and service modules in lunar orbit.

One of the first steps taken on the Moon – this is an image of Buzz Aldrin’s bootprint from the Apollo 11 mission.

The logo for the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing gives a nod to the past with a few elements borrowed from the original Apollo program emblem and a glimpse into the future with a graphic depiction of NASA’s vision for the next half-century of deep space exploration.  The arc through the word “Apollo” represents Earth’s limb, or horizon, as seen from a spacecraft.  It serves as a reminder of how the first views of Earth from the Moon – one of NASA’s crowning achievements – forever transformed the way we see ourselves as human beings.

 

“We need to continue pushing the boundaries of knowledge and exploration.  Don’t forget, one of the greatest joys is learning…….  Keep exploring!” – Amelia Piper, MajorTim.space – CEO/founder/manager

 

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MajorTim.space’s ‘Galactic Outreach Workshops’ at World Museum, Liverpool’s Footprints on the Moon event – Apollo 50th Anniversary – 20th July 2019!

We will be running our drop-in ‘Minuscule Phenomenon!’ workshops at World Museum, Liverpool’s Footprints on the Moon event – 20th July 2019!

This fantastic event is being held on the Apollo 50th Anniversary so we will be celebrating by running our drop-in workshops.

Our drop-in ‘Minuscule Phenomenon!’ workshops includes the opportunity to find and see Tardigrades through microscopes, learn all the facts and meet Mossy, our large-scale 3d printed model of a Tardigrade to see what their fascinating features look like in more detail.

In addition to the activities above – we will be running our popular Thaumatrope workshop – Apollo theme!

 We will also have our new ‘Design your own Pioneer of STEM’ activity.

Plus, we will be bringing our MajorTim.space Galactic Photo Prop.

Click the link below to find out more about the event on the World Museum, Liverpool website – http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/wml/events/displayevent.aspx?EventId=40208

Come and find us to help celebrate Apollo 50th Annniversary!

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MajorTim.space’s ‘Galactic Outreach Workshops’ at Penrhyn Bay Summer Fete – Celebrating Asteroid Day – 30th June 2019!

We had a fantastic time running our drop-in ‘Be Mystified – The Forces of Science!’ workshops at Penrhyn Bay Summer Fete – 30th June 2019!

The event was held on Asteroid Day – so we celebrated by running our drop-in workshops.

Visitors to our stand made Thaumatropes – while learning the science behind them – which they could take away with them.

We had some different visitors to our stand because the event was also a Dog Show!

We took our MajorTim.space Galactic Photo Prop which was very popular with the visitors and the dogs!
More photos of visitors with the photo accessory at the end of the article.

The lucky winner of our raffle was Graham!
The prize was a signed photo of Helen Sharman.
He was thrilled with his prize (below).

 

All of the visitors had a STEMtastic time celebrating Asteroid Day 2019 at our stand!

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MajorTim.space’s ‘Galactic Outreach Workshops’ at Penrhyn Bay Summer Fete – Celebrating Asteroid Day!

We will be running our drop-in ‘Be Mystified – The Forces of Science!’ workshops at Penrhyn Bay Summer Fete – 30th June 2019.

The event is being held on Asteroid Day – so we will be celebrating by running our workshops.

Make a Thaumatrope – while learning the science behind it – which you can take away with you!

Plus, we will be bringing our MajorTim.space Galactic Photo Prop.
The event also includes a Dog Show, so come and have a STEMtastic photo taken with your dog or on your own!

The event will be held on the Princes Green, Penrhyn Bay – 30th June 2019, 12pm – 4pm.

Come and find us to help Celebrate Asteroid Day 2019!

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MajorTim.space’s ‘Galactic Outreach Workshops’ at United Kingdom Imaging & Oncology Congress (UKIO) 2019 School Session!

We had a fantastic time running our drop-in ‘Minuscule Phenomenon!’ workshops at United Kingdom Imaging & Oncology Congress (UKIO) School Session – 12th June 2019!

Pupils age 13+ had a lecture by Dallas Campbell when they arrived before coming to our sessions –

Students enjoyed taking part in our drop-in ‘Minuscule Phenomenon!’ workshops, which includes the opportunity to find and see Tardigrades through microscopes, learn all the facts and meet Mossy, our large-scale 3d printed model of a Tardigrade to see what their fascinating features look like in more detail.

Every time we run our ‘Minuscule Phenomenon!’ workshops, we take as many photos as possible of the visitors with Mossy (the 3d printed Tardigrade).
Mossy was very popular!
More photos of visitors with Mossy at the end of the article.

In addition to the activities stated above we also had our incredible interactive Virtual Reality learning activity.

All of the pupils had a STEMtastic time!

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